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Archery Tips

Bow Tuning – Part I

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So its almost that time of year again when the days get shorter and the air gets cooler. Soon the bucks will be shedding their velvet and bowhunters will be taking to the woods in hopes of bagging a bruiser, after all this season is the season it will happen (it always is after the last season).

I personally always am interested to see what the latest and greatest new archery gear comes out each season and, as so, have changed the components on my bow almost every season for the last 4 years. This year I’ve finally decided to call it quits and stick with my current set up. I have an older Mathews MQ-32 (which is now discontinued) with a 6 arrow Kwikee Kwiver, 3-pin TRUGLO fiber optic sight with glow ring and light for the pins, a Doinker 4″ stabilizer, an NAP QuickTune DropAway 4000 arrow rest and a large aperature peep sight. The arrows I’m shooting this year are Beman MAX-4 with 4″ Duravanes and Muzzy 100g MX-4 broadheads.

I was not so great at keeping up with my shooting this summer and only practiced a handful of times. With the Connecticut bow season opening on September 15th I figured I might as well begin to sight my bow in from an elevated position with my broadheads. As I started my broadhead tuning, I noticed my groups were nothing to brag about and as most bowhunters usually do, I blamed it on the bow and not myself. In this case, however, I was correct in saying that it was the bow’s fault the patterns were not grouping well. After all, I had never really tuned the bow with this complete setup. The following day I went down to my parents house where my father has set up a small archery range. For the first time, I paper tuned my bow. From the first shot I could tell that my bow was far from being set up correctly. The tip of the arrow entered the paper low and the tail of the arrow entered the paper high and to the right. With a few adjustments to my nocking point and a bit of adjusting to my arrowrest I was eventually, two hours later, able to get my bow shooting “bullet holes” through the paper.

My next step in the endeavor is to complete a “walk back tuning” of my bow. The idea behind this concept is to start at 20 yards and walk back in 5 yard increments shooting your arrows in a vertical line to see if they are shooting straight or veering off to the left or right. The same is also done on a horizontal line to see if the arrows are hitting high and low. These two simple tests (although there are plenty more I could be doing) should give me a good enough set up to begin tuning my bow for broadheads. I have already felt the difference in my shooting as the arrows fly much truer and give me more margin for error. I strongly recommend that every archer take the time to paper tune his or her bow and perform at least one other tuning test before sighting the bow in for broadheads. I can’t wait to see the difference in the woods this year, when that monster buck comes crashing through the woods, I want to be able to put him down within 40 yards…the season just can’t come soon enough!

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Archery Tips

Keep Your Bowhunting Skills Sharp with 3D Shooting

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Over the last few weekends we’ve been headed over to Blue Mountain Sportsman Center to shoot 3D. The course has been a lot of fun to shoot. There’s several targets to shoot at including deer, turkey, bear, and fox. The terrain makes it very realistic practice for hunting with shots at inclines and declines to simulate actual hunting scenarios.

One thing I like to do is shoot from the furthest stakes and guess the yardage. Then after we all shoot we range the target to see how close we were to guessing the distance. This really helps me to learn how to judge distance in the field and is a valuable tool for when an animal catches you off guard in the field. Shooting from the furthest stakes also make the closer shots seem easier.

If you haven’t been out shooting 3D this summer then you better hurry up and get out there because hunting season will be here before you know it. Blue Mountain Sportsman Center is open Thursday – Sunday and holidays. Shooting a round of 3D costs $12 with a county park pass and is $15 without a park pass.

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Archery Tips

Indoor Archery Leagues at Extreme Archery

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Team NYB will be joining the Hunter League at Extreme Archery set to begin on September 3rd. The Hunter League will be held on Fridays for 6 weeks and feature various animal targets.

We’re looking forward to participating in the league and sharpening our skills for the upcoming season. The indoor league is a great way to meet fellow archers and practice shooting under a little bit of pressure!

Here are the details on the Indoor Archery Leagues at Extreme Archery:

Kids League ($70, 8 weeks)
– begins Saturday, September 4th @ 10:00am

300 Target League ($90, 7 weeks)
– begins Wednesday, September 1st @ 6:30pm

Hunter League ($90, 6 weeks)
– begins Friday, September 3rd @ 6:30pm

Traditional League (TBD)
– call to find out more

To sign up for any of the Indoor Archery Leagues call Extreme Archery at 914-777-7500.

Extreme Archery is located at 801 East Boston Post Rd, Mamaroneck, NY 10543.

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Archery Tips

How to Set the Perfect Treestand

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This is something new I’m adding to my arsenal of tricks this season to help me set the perfect stand (works for trail cams too)! It’s called the Photographer’s Ephemeris, a tool designed to help landscape photographers take the perfect picture at sunrise or sunset.

The tool allows you to pick a location, date and time to see exactly where the sun and moon will be. This allows you to follow the path of the sun and moon on any given date and at any given time.

So how does this help the hunter? Simple. It allows the hunter to find a stand location on the map and then see how the sun will rise and set during the hunting season so that the sun is never in the hunter’s eyes.

I entered the location of our lease in the program and changed the date to opening day. Where we have our stands situated is in the perfect spot with the sun rising to our right and circling behind us before setting to our left. That means if the deer are out in the hunting plot where we hope to shoot them we will have the sun behind us which will make it much harder for the deer to pick us out of the tree.

This is a great tool I will be playing around with more and more this season as I hang some tree stands over the next few weeks. Below is a video on how it works:

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